Welcome to my Crafty Blog!

samantha sews

I'm Samantha (Sam), a mechanical engineer, seamstress, crafter, & entrepreneur. Enjoy perusing photos of my sewing and craft-related adventures. I hope my blog brings inspiration and happiness to your day!

My Products

maker signs from lasercut wood, available at samanthasnap on etsy

plush narwhal sewing kit: make a narwhal! available at fluffyland

wood camera necklaces, available at samanthasnap on etsy

Fluffyland Narwhal Sewing Pattern, Whale Sewing Pattern PDF

popular posts

Handmade Wool Alpaca Plush Tiny Handmade Plush Cactus
Annual Ladies' Board Rummage Sale orange sewing machine from germany
Marietta Big Chicken custom plush tiny narwhal graduation gift

Tutorials & Free Projects

Tiny Thread Spool Pushpins Tutorial X-Stitch Throw Pillow Tutorial
Starburst Wrapper Bracelet Tutorial Vintage Hassock Reupholstery DIY
Safety Eye Installation Tutorial for Plush a guide to sewing in your dorm room
Sewing Basket Essentials for Beginners a gift guide for the seamstress who has everything

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sponsored: my favorite tools

NEW BLOG: SamanthaSews Sewing Blog!

I’m blogging again! I started a new blog in October 2019: SamanthaSews Sewing Blog. It’s been so fun to share my projects again and I hope you’ll come follow my latest crafty adventures.

Here are the most recent posts from SamanthaSews:

And here are some of my favorite posts so far (as of writing this post in June 2020).

The Fluffyland Blog will remain open as an archive, but all of my new blog posts will be posted to SamanthaSews.

handmade tee: black knit with flowered placket

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

Time to share another me-made! It’s another simple tee, actually shares the same guts as my favorite handmade blue bird shirt: 2-piece pattern, just a front and a back, no pesky sleeves. For this one I added a colorful flowered placket detail for contrast, and I thought I’d walk you through how I did it.

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

I started by cutting out the tee and constructing the placket separately. A typical placket has extra fabric sewn behind it to finish the raw edges of the slit, but I cheated. I constructed my placket with two pieces of fabric rather than one, and the seam down the center (and its generous seam allowance) allowed me to finish those edges without adding more fabric.

I sewed my two rectangles together until about halfway up, then used the rest of that unsewn area to make the slit, hemming it into the Vee shape you see above.

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

Flipped, pressed, ready to go!

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

I then placed the placket on the shirt front, lining up the bottom edge where I wanted it to end up. I flipped the placket to sew it right-to-right along the placket’s bottom seam: that way, when I flip the placket to the right side, everything is in the right place and one set of raw edges is taken care of.

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

After stitching that seam, I pressed the raw edges of the right and left sides of the placket under, then turned everything to the right side. This photo was taken right before topstitching the sides in place.

After top stitching, the placket was securely attached and I finished up by trimming away the black shirt fabric behind it. I did a few hand stitches to make the corners extra secure, and then continued with the shirt as normal. I finished the neckline of the shirt with a strip of black binding, and that finished the last raw edge of the placket.

The final special touch on this shirt is the sleeves: I bound the end of each sleeve with a strip of fabric to match the placket and tie it all together. That might be my favorite part!

handmade tee - black with flowered placket

My mom took these modeled shots on our family trip to Barcelona: here I am at Parc Guell, one of my favorite places in the whole world. The mosaic benches are just amazing… every time I look at my pictures I become ever more determined to tile my kitchen backsplash using broken plates. How awesome would that be?!

Sewing Room Tour: 2018 Edition

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

Welcome to my new sewing room! It’s my favorite room in the house: this is where the magic happens. Out of all the rooms, this one has taken the most tweaking to get it just how I like it. It’s a never-ending process, but I love where it’s at right now so it’s time for a tour!

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

First of all, this room is huge and bright. There are two windows, and I added four recessed, dimmable LEDs in the ceiling so I’m never lacking for light. I painted the walls gray, like I’ve always dreamed, and I’ll never fall out of love with that original hardwood.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

When you enter the room, the far wall holds my two main machines: regular Juki (she’s new! and i love her!) and my Babylock serger (also very loved). The dresser in between holds supplies: quilting rulers, needles and pins, screwdrivers and spare parts. The small wooden drawers on top hold the easy-access notions: scissors, snips, chalk/pens, seam rippers.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

I found this ironing board the week after I moved in: it was propped against my neighbor’s trashcan, waiting for its trip to the landfill. I couldn’t resist the color, so it came home with me, I removed the legs, and now it’s my magnet + peg board.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

The Juki came with its own table, so I shortened this desk by chopping a few inches off the legs to make it an ideal sewing height. The desk was a steal at a recent estate sale: I found it in the corner of a shed, and the top was all dusty, so they let me have it for $20. Its two drawers are perfect for holding the Juki manual, presser feet, and extra bobbins, and the best part is that the drawers are just small enough that I’m not tempted to clutter them up with less related things.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

I try to keep this little table near the entryway clear for sewing lessons – if someone brings her own machine, that’s where we set it up. The rolling cart underneath holds my plywood sheets for laser cutting, and it’s easy to roll out of the way when I need that space.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

The cutting table lives in the center of the room, and I finally live in a space big enough for the table to hold both leaves. It’s sheer luxury to have a table this big and flat and ready for whatever I throw at it. I have two rolling drawer units underneath: one holds all of my “neutral” fabrics: white/black/gray cottons, knits, or linings ready to accent whatever I’m making. The other holds larger cuts and my trusty paper cutter lives on top, ready to roll into action.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

The white shoe divider is dedicated to fabrics with an intended purpose: the “on-deck” shelf. The bookcase holds my trims, buttons, and, currently… the fabrics I haven’t managed to put away elsewhere. I just got most of those blue-handled bins for Christmas and it was so satisfying to finally sort all the zippers, bias tapes, and cording into their own bins.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

This vintage drawer thing holds my buttons, sorted by color, and other handy supplies like q-tips, popsicle sticks, small glues, baker’s twine. Another estate sale find from a while back, it wasn’t super dirty when I got it, but I ran the drawers through the dishwasher and they came out sparkling.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

I mounted an over-the-door ironing board to the wall to save space. That was another big deal for me – not only do I get two leaves in my cutting table, but I get a full-sized ironing board! That’s the closet door, and to the far left is the door back out to the rest of the house.

Fluffyland Sewing Room Tour: 2018

Here’s my closet: another splurge in clear, clip-top bins. It feels amazing. My fabric has never been so organized, and the half-height bins mean a lot less digging is required. All the fluff – foam and polyfil – lives on the top shelf.

And that’s my sewing room! It’s certainly not always this clean, but so far I’ve been making a good effort to keep it organized. It’s a wonderful place to sew, craft, and teach. Thanks for coming on the tour with me!